Colourful crossings

Artist Dan Maier created a colourful pedestrian crossing in Southgate to reflect the rainbows that have become a symbol during the pandemic
Artist Dan Maier created a colourful pedestrian crossing in Southgate to reflect the rainbows that have become a symbol during the pandemic

Artists commissioned by Enfield Council to design new road markings

Five pedestrian crossings in the borough have been brightened up by local artists.

Enfield Council commissioned “colourful, playful designs” for crossings in Angel Edmonton, Edmonton Green, Enfield Town, Palmers Green and Southgate, as part of an initiative to see “how art can transform public spaces”.

The Southgate crossing was designed by Dan Maier, founder of Southgate and Palmers Green Art Trail. She said: “The colour scheme references the rainbows so prevalent during lockdown, symbolising peace and hope.”

Artist Patrick Samuel at the crossing he designed in Green Lanes
Artist Patrick Samuel at the crossing he designed in Green Lanes

The Palmers Green crossing was designed by Patrick Samuel to “celebrate and represent the diversity of Enfield”.

Artist Kareen Cox created a series of mini portraits to “represent the diverse culture of the area” for her Edmonton Green crossing, while in Angel Edmonton, the area’s contribution to modern technology, as the birthplace of colour television, was celebrated.

In Enfield Town, illustrator and art teacher Hasan Bölücek designed a crossing based around “the importance of nature’s elements in Alevi culture”.

A council spokesperson said: “The colourful works of art celebrate the arts and cultural heritage of Enfield. They were commissioned to light up our high streets and provide a boost for our communities and local economy.”

Artist Kareen Cox with her colourful crossing in Fore Street
Artist Kareen Cox with her colourful crossing in Fore Street

The first version of Hasan’s artwork in Enfield Town was removed as a “precaution” following safety concerns. Responding to criticism over the £55,000 cost of the five crossings, the spokesperson added: “The crossings were funded from a ring-fenced amount for public art from the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) and Section 106. The monies could not have been used for other council services.”