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New Enfield mayor aims to help people affected by cancer and autism

Suna Hurman has taken over the civic role from Doris Jiagge and will serve the borough for the next year

Suna Hurman takes the chains of office at Enfield Civic Centre (credit Enfield Council)
Suna Hurman takes the chains of office at Enfield Civic Centre (credit Enfield Council)

Suna Hurman has been elected by her fellow councilors to serve as the mayor of Enfield for 2023/24.

The Labour councillor, who represents Enfield Lock ward and was first elected to the council at last year’s local election, was sworn in as mayor at last night’s annual council meeting. Cllr Hurman has replaced Doris Jiagge in the role.

Alongside her, Ponders End councillor Mohammad Islam – also first elected in 2022 – will serve as deputy mayor.

Cllr Hurman is now set to attend around 500 civic engagements over the next year. Traditionally mayors pick good causes for their fundraising efforts and the Enfield Lock councillor has chosen cancer and autism as two issues she wishes to focus on.


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Cllr Hurman said: “I am delighted to have been sworn in as the borough’s mayor for the forthcoming year, and I look forward to meeting as many residents and local business owners as possible during my tenure.

“I have chosen to support cancer and autism charities as they are both causes that are close to my heart. I hope to raise as much as I can to help improve the lives of those affected by cancer and autism.”

Local young people have also elected Darren Paul, aged 15, as the new Enfield young mayor, plus Sila Karapinar, aged twelve, as deputy young mayor. They will help the council achieve its ambitions to “work more closely with young people” and help “deliver a lifetime of opportunities in the borough”.

The young mayor and deputy mayor are part of Enfield Youth Parliament and the duo have been elected for one year to represent the views of young people.


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